Our Salt Lake City periodontal office is centrally located and is easily accessible to accommodate
all periodontal patient physical needs. You will be
welcomed by the beautiful landscape
and charmed history of the
Old Farm Professional Plaza.

CALL TODAY to schedule your appointment:
(801) 266-3519
 Old Farm Professional Plaza - 4010 S. 700 E., Ste #8, SLC, UT 84107
Nosotros Hablamos Español
appointment testimonials

Periodontal disease and its associated complications affect both men and women, so it's important that both sexes are doing everything they can to maintain their periodontal health. However, research1 published in the Journal of Periodontology suggests that women are more proactive in maintaining healthy teeth and gums than men. In fact, the study found that women are almost twice as likely to have received a regular dental check-up in the past year, and women in the study also had better indicators of periodontal health, including lower incidence of dental plaque than men. Overall, the study suggested that women have a better understanding of oral health, as well as a more positive attitude towards dental visits. This understanding is important for women, as hormonal fluctuations throughout a woman's life may affect her periodontal health and, therefore, overall health. Certain life stages may increase women's susceptibility to periodontal disease, which may require special attention:

It's easy to ignore the effects of poor oral hygiene because they're hidden in your mouth. But gum disease produces a bleeding, infected wound that's the equivalent in size to the palms of both your hands, says Susan Karabin, DDS, a New York periodontist and president of the American Academy of Periodontology.

"If you had an infection that size on your thigh, you'd be hospitalized," Karabin says. "Yet people walk around with this infection in their mouth and ignore it. It's easy to ignore because it doesn't hurt ... but it's a serious infection, and if it were in a more visible place, it would be taken more seriously."

You may think that the worst consequence of poor dental health would be lost teeth and painful times in the dentist's chair. But some studies have linked common oral problems to illnesses, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, premature birth, osteoporosis, and even Alzheimer's disease. In most cases, the strength and exact nature of the link is unclear, but they suggest that dental health is important for preserving overall health.

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Dr. Mark Mangelson, DDS MS

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Testimonials

I have had a number of periodontal procedures including gum grafts, recession correction, bone grafting and ongoing maintenance at Dr. Mark Mangelson's Salt Lake City periodontal office. I hav...

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